In this post:

  • WSS vs MOSS
  • SharePoint site architecture

SharePoint is an ecosystem of software and server products as it was described in this previous post. To understand it better let's look at the architecture and object model that it is offered with SharePoint. The basic component of SharePoint is Windows SharePoint Services (WSS from now on). WSS is a free server component that must be installed in a Windows Server OS and contains the basic framework and infrastructure that supports any other SharePoint offerings like the different Microsoft Office SharePoint Server (MOSS from now on) versions.

You can think of it the same way selling cars work. You get the basic model with a chassis, 4 tires and a steering wheel (that will be WSS) and then you can add stuff to it like a great sound system, a dynamic design, GPS and Cruise Control, etc (those nifty things being the analogous to MOSS).

So now that we have an idea of how WSS relates to MOSS, let's see exactly how their offerings stand apart.

As we can see all MOSS trims are nothing more than a very useful set of extensions and additions to the WSS platform, offering users a more powerful and pleasant experience out of the box. These extensions are supported thanks to a very complex architecture and framework that has evolved quite a bit over time.

In a nutshell the industry refers to a SharePoint installation (be it WSS only or MOSS) as a SharePoint FARM. A Farm is a collection of physical SharePoint servers  that serve the content to users. A Farm can be formed using different topologies that we'll explore later, before we get to that, let's actually see what is going to be served, how does SharePoint structures its web sites and content.

Farm:  A collection of SharePoint Web Applications.

SP Web Application:  A collection of Site Collections.

SP Site Collection: Formed by a single root site (aka Top-Level site) and a collection of sub-sites.

SP Sub-Site: A collection of pages, lists, libraries and content that are displayed through the browser.

Each of these components in the SharePoint site architecture have different rules and security settings and restrictions. As you can see, this is a tree structure and very successful way to isolate users and content to ensure confidentiality, availability and integrity in the data security. This model is very user friendly since everyone can understand a tree structure and most people are already used to it.

I always like to compare a SharePoint Farm with a physical hard drive. If the Farm is the hard drive, then we can think of the Web Applications as partitions of the Farm. Likewise Site Collections will be Folders directly on the root of the partition. Sub-Sites are also represented by folders that only go inside of the Site Collections and so on, you get the idea.

Because is easy to understand the site architecture SharePoint offers, users can quickly provision (a fancy word for 'create') web sites with the click of a button. Because of this, planning for a successful deployment and IT infrastructure to support all the greatness SharePoint offers does not come at ease. Planning the right topology that will hold all of this together is very important for a successful SharePoint deployment. More on SharePoint topology and planning in upcoming posts.

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